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PARIVAR VICHHORA, GURDWARA, situated on the north bank of the rivulet Sarsa, about 12 km north of Ropar (30°58`N, 76° 31`E) in the Punjab, signifies the tragic happenings that followed the evacuation of Anandpur by Guru Gobind Singh. `Parivar Vichhora` literally means `dispersal of the family*. When after the evacuation of Anandpur during the night of 56 December 1705, Guru Gobind Singh arrived at this place with the enemy host in hot pursuit, he found Sarsa in spate. A minor seasonal tributary of the Sutlej, Sarsa, being close to the Sivalik foothills, is subject to sudden flooding during the rains.

Guru Gobind Singh decided to split the column into two.While a part of the force was to engage the enemy, the others were to get across the river as best they could. The Guru, along with his four sons, the ladies of the household and about 150 followers, reached the other bank of the angry stream, but several others and the entire baggage train were washed away in the flood. Meanwhile, the rearguard kept the host in check. Many died; the survivors, sure of the Guru`s safety, made good their escape in different directions.

Though safe across the river, Guru Gobind Singh`s family could no longer keep together.He himself with his two elder sons and 40 Sikhs went towards Chamkaur; his two wives, escorted by a few Sikhs, reached Delhi, while his aged mother and two younger sons were escorted by a servant, Gangu by name, to his village near Morinda where he betrayed them. Gurdwara Parivar Vichhora Sahib Patshahi 10 is an elegant fourstoreyed building on top of a high pyramidal base riveted all around with stones, about 300 metres away from the Sarsa bank. It was completed in the 1970`s. The room where the Guru Granth Sahib is seated is about 15 metres above the ground level.

This room, on the second storey, has a mosaic floor and its walls and ceiling are profusely painted in multicoloured designs. There is a domed pavilion above it, with decorative cupolas at the corners. There are two rows of rooms at ground level near by for Guru ka Larigar and for residential purposes. Human bones, kards and weapons, said to have been discovered at the site during the excavation for foundationlaying, have been preserved for display in the Gurdwara. Sant Ajit Singh of Niholka who supervised the construction of the Gurdwara continues to manage the administration. An annual fair is held on 1 Poh (midDecember).

References :

1. Gian Singh, Giani, Twarikh Guru Khaisa [Reprint]. Patiala 1970
2. Kuir Singh, Gurbilas Patshahi 10. ed. Shamsher Singh Ashok. Patiala, 1968

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